Motorcycle KTM RC8 R Circuit Japan Driveclub Riding the Bike HD

Racing Wheel : Thrustmaster T500RS + Shift TH8R
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The KTM 1190 RC8 is a sport bike made by KTM.[1] The first generation 2008 model had a 1,148 cc (70.1 cu in) V-twin engine and was the Austrian manufacturer’s first-ever Superbike design. The RC8 model was supplemented with RC8 R models one year later in 2009 and the RC8 designation had its last year of production in 2010. Current models from 2009 through 2013 use a 1,195 cc (72.9 cu in) V-twin engine with a twin spark per cylinder technology [2] design debuting on the 2011 model.

The first concept of the bike appeared in 2005, powered by the Super Duke 999 cc (61.0 cu in) v-twin. The displacement was increased to 1,148 cc (70.1 cu in) for the production version. The bike has a steel trellis frame with a cast aluminium seat subframe. The suspension uses high-end inverted forks and an alloy, double-sided swingarm made by WP, a KTM subsidiary. The bike for 2013 and on comes in a single color, black and white with orange accents.

The RC8 R was delivered to the United States in 2010 as a 2011 model with more track-oriented features than the standard RC8. Engine displacement increased to 1,195 cc (72.9 cu in) with a higher compression ratio of 13.5:1. It has titanium intake valves and a low-friction diamond-like carbon (DLC) treatment on its camshafts’ finger followers. The RC8 R’s WP suspension includes a 43 mm inverted fork at the front end, with a titanium-aluminum-nitride low-stiction coating on its sliders. A high-end shock supports the bike’s rear, and its piston rod is also finished with the titanium-aluminum-nitride coating. The fork has three modes of adjustment (compression damping, rebound damping and spring preload), while the shock separates the compression damping into high and low speed circuits and has ride-height adjustability. An adjustable steering damper completes the suspension.

The RC8 R offers many chassis adjustments not found on other superbikes. In addition to the suspension, the rider can adjust many other parts on the bike including the front brake lever, the rear brake pedal, the clutch lever, the handlebars, the shifter, the footpegs, and the seat/subframe height. Essentially, the adjustable options allow the RC8 R to accommodate riders of various sizes

Internal improvements were made for these model years based on rider reviews and in-house testing. 250 models were made for North America for 2011 and 2012 years. The KTM engineers included a heavier crankshaft and flywheel aimed at reducing the buzzy nature of the previous RC8R and to emphasize low-end torque. Throttle butterflies were remapped to reduce the amount of opening under small throttle inputs for much smoother transitions and to address the “snatchy throttle” complaints directed at the earlier models. The new cylinder head uses two spark plugs in each cylinder; below 7,000 rpm only one of the two fires, while above 7,000 both are used for optimum burning and reduced detonation which also allows for a re-tuned ECU that has revamped cam timing and the 52 mm throttle bodies. Also new with this model are cast aluminum Marchesini wheels and strategic front and rear suspension updates

At the launch of the RC8 superbike KTM announced it will race in the RC8 in the FIM Superstock championship in 2008. KTM’s two-year plan is to get the bike regularly on the podium in superstock before moving up to the Superbike World Championship. For 2009 the KTM RC8 Super Cup has been running as a one make support class at selected rounds of the British Superbike Championship, and in 2010 Redline KTM are competing in the newly formed BSB Evo class with rider James Edmeades.

For 2012, Chris Filmore (USA) riding for the KTM Factory Racing team earned his career best finish at the final round of the AMA Pro SuperBike Series held at NOLA Motorsports Park on October 6 finishing 4th that day, 5th place the next,[6] ending the season 11th overall and is signed with the team for 2013 +++++

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Motorcycle YAMAHA YZF R1 Camera Onboard Driveclub Full HD

Racing Wheel : Thrustmaster T500RS + Shift TH8R
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The Yamaha YZF-R1, or R1, is an open class sport bike,[1] or superbike,[2][3][4] motorcycle manufactured by Yamaha Motor Company since 1998.

Yamaha launched the YZF-R1 after redesigning the Genesis engine to create a more compact engine by raising the gearbox input shaft and allowing the gearbox output shaft to be placed beneath it. This design feature was revolutionary, called a ‘stacked gearbox’, it has set a precedent for other manufacturers to follow. This “compacting” of the engine made the total engine length much shorter overall, thereby, allowing the wheelbase of the motorcycle to be shortened significantly. This, in turn, allowed the frame design to place the weight of the engine in the frame to aid handling because of an optimized center of gravity. The swingarm was able to be made longer without compromising the overall wheelbase, which was a short 1385mm. These features, combined with a steep fork angle, exceptional brakes and racing streamlining, created a bike that was unbeatable on the race track at the time. Four Kehin CV carburetors of 40mm diameter fed fuel to the engine, 140 bhp was claimed by the factory, at the countershaft. USD 41mm front forks supplied by KYB mounted 300mm semi-floating disk brakes. The instrument panel was revolutionary, having an electrical problem, self diagnosis system inbuilt, and digital speed readout. The exhaust system utilised an EXUP valve, which controlled the exhaust gas flow, to maximise engine power production at all revs, creating a high powered but also torquey engine. The twin headlights were powerful, allowing high speed travelling at night. The bike had a compression ratio of 11.8:1 with a six-speed transmission and multi-plate clutch.

The Yamaha YZF-R6 was introduced in 1999 as the 600 cc version of the R1 super bike.

2005 YZF-R1 instrumentation
The 1999 R1 saw only minor changes, apart from paint and graphics. Notable improvements were a redesigned gear change linkage and the gear change shaft length being increased. Fuel tank reserve capacity was reduced from 5.5 to 4.0 litres (1.2 to 0.9 imp gal or 1.5 to 1.1 US gal), while the total fuel tank capacity was unchanged at 18 l (4.0 imp gal; 4.8 US gal).

Motorcycle Consumer News tests of the 1998 model year YZF-R1 yielded a 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) time of 2.96 seconds and 0 to 100 mph (0 to 161 km/h) of 5.93 seconds, a 1⁄4-mile (400 m) time of 10.19 seconds at 131.40 mph (211.47 km/h), and a top speed of 168 mph (270 km/h), with deceleration from 60 to 0 mph (97 to 0 km/h) of 113.9 ft (34.7 m).[1] For the 1999 model year, Cycle World tests found a 0 to 60 mph time of 3.0 seconds, 1⁄4-mile time of 10.31 seconds at 139.55 mph (224.58 km/h), and a top speed of 170 mph (270 km/h)

In 2000, Yamaha introduced a series of changes to improve the bike, and minor changes to the bodywork to allow for better long duration ride handling. Yamaha’s main design goal was to sharpen the pre-existing bike and not to redesign it. The dry weight was reduced five pounds to 414 pounds (188 kg).[6]

At 127.8 horsepower (95.3 kW) at the rear wheel,[6] top-end output remained the same, but changes to the engine management system were intended to result in a smoother, broader distribution of power. The bodywork was still unmistakably R1, although a few changes were made resulting in a 3% reduction in the drag coefficient. The headlight housing’s profile was sharpened, the side panels were made more aerodynamic and slippery, and the windscreen was reshaped for better rider protection.

The seating area was also updated. The fuel tank was reshaped, with a more relaxed rear angle and deeper leg recesses to provide for a better rider feel. The seat extended further towards the rear of the tank and the new, steeper, seating position put additional weight on the front end. All of this was aimed at improving weight bias and offering sharper cornering and more stability.

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